Another Reason Why Birth Is Sacred

Jan 1, 2014 by

Long ago I learned that rescuing people from their own actions is often a trap, one that ensnares us as well as the person we are trying to help.  When it comes to my client’s birth it can be really hard as she makes decisions that are not going to take her in the direction she previously desired.  As a doula I want to grab her and say, “No! Nooo….No!”  The more attached I am to her personally the harder it is…until I shift my thinking.  Once I remind myself to respect the transformation and challenges of pregnancy and birth as a sacred path it becomes much easier to support and serve this mother.

Several decades ago there was a lot of interest in vision quests* and understanding the deeper spiritual nature of existence.  These journeys of challenge and hardship were entered into to discover one’s strengths, weaknesses, inner nature, and relationship to the Divine.  For some groups it also involved the risk of death.  Joseph Campbell wrote extensively about the “hero’s journey” and the meaning and interpretations of this myth in contemporary society.  (Today we have Frodo and Harry Potter.)

Early on in my path as a doula, I saw the potential of birth to hold these same meanings for today’s women.  Women faced these same challenges by gestating, giving birth, and nursing – they didn’t always need a vision quest in the wilderness.  While our culture has not adopted the idea of a ritualized journey, the experience of childbirth still holds this potential for women.

If we appreciate a woman’s birth story as her own personal myth it has the potential to reveal to her deep truth and knowing about herself.  It can be a mirror of who she is.  Within her birth story is how she deals with challenge, how she deals with authority, how she supports herself, what strengths she brings forth that she didn’t know she had.  It reveals her relationship to what is unknowable and undefinable in human existence.  She must give herself over to a process that may be unknown to her that she is not in control of.  How does she respond?  What allies does she call upon?  When the crisis comes, what does she do?  How does she deal with her deep fear as it faces her in the mirror?  How does she experience pain and what does she want to do about it and what does she do about it?  How does this mother see the world?  How does she see her place in it?

To me, every laboring woman I am with is traversing this terrain.  My role is to guide her to finding her own way not to show her which way is right.  There is no way I can know her inner experience or how her history has shaped her to act in these moments.  I don’t need to know – I just need to trust that this journey is unfolding as it should for her.  Women have taught me to trust them to find their own truth.

This doesn’t mean it’s easy.  This doesn’t mean I don’t speak up; it means I trust her to let me know she wants me to.  It means I have developed an automatic questioning in response to my “No! No!”: “Is it about me or about her?”    It means I trust that when she whispers, “I think I want an epidural.”  I whisper back, “Do you want to talk about it some or do you know that’s what you want?”  If she nods “yes”, I get the nurse.  I believe she KNOWS and I do not rob her of that power of choice.  To dither about her birth plan is to diminish her as being able to know what is best for her in that moment.  My service is to trust her unconditionally as the heroine on her own quest.  She will find herself whether she wants to or not.

In my decades of doulaing I have found that many women come back to me and say that their birth taught them so much about themselves.   They learned who they were.  They faced their fears and lived the consequences of their choices.  When a woman has support, true support without an agenda, she finds her voice.  We amplify it so others can hear it too.

Women change their lives based on their births.  They end bad relationships, become fiercer mothers, move across the country, yell at their obstetricians, yell at their midwives, hug and cry with their obstetricians and their midwives, grieve for not knowing.  They grieve for the woman they left behind and embrace the woman they now are.  Who am I to know what is best for that woman in the midst of her birth?  I know nothing!

This acknowledgement of the deep spiritual nature of birth and the risks it contains for crisis and change, keeps me humble.  It also frees me.  I am a chosen companion for the journey, an ally who will respond as needed. Sometimes offering wisdom but always offering patience and calm.  I follow her lead because this is Her Story, the myth she is living and creating with each breath.  I trust Her and I trust my service to her, which is why birth and the path of doulaing when practiced this way is sacred.

 

“It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life.  Where you stumble, there lies your treasure.”   -Joseph Campbell

 

* The term “vision quest” has different historical and cultural meanings in Native American or First People cultures.  I’m using a popular culture definition of the term.

 

If you wish to explore these ideas further:

The Women’s Wheel of Life, Elizabeth Davis* and Carol Leonard, Penguin/Arkana, 1996     (*midwife and author of the midwifery textbook, Heart and Hands)

The Wholistic Stages of Labor by Whapio Diane Bartlett    http://www.thematrona.com/apps/blog/the-holistic-stages-of-labor-by-whapio

The Woman Who Runs With The Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype by Clarissa Pinkola Estes, Ballantine Books (1993)

Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth DVD Documentary, PBS, 1988, 2013

Transformation Through Birth, Claudia Panuthos, Bergin and Garvey, 1984 (still being published!)

Birthing From Within, Pam England, Partera Press, 1998

 

6 Comments

  1. Mari

    Amen. Amen. Amen. Thank you for these words, they’re just what I needed to hear in my journey as newbie doula.

  2. Amy, Your beautifully written post was uplifting for me. Your image of pregnancy, birth, and the return being a woman’s living vision quest speaks to me; that in birth, our wilderness can be within. I value how you view and cherish a woman’s experience as her sacred journey, her personal myth unfolding, and yourself as her chosen companion and ally… humble, and free… and very wise. … Inspired by your post, I closed my eyes to relish the sacred, in-service, and heroic path of the doula. Thank you.

  3. Wonderful. Thank you for this. It is so transformational and also so very different for each mama.

  4. Thank you Amy for this lovely reminder for the New Year that it’s through struggle we are shaped and polished. I’m carrying that forward!

  5. Beautiful post. I have come to believe that childbirth is a transformational time. Becoming a mother happens over a long period of time, the psychological, emotional & spiritual changes of parenthood are a profound developmental live passage. Oe I am so glad I had the privilege of transversing in my lifetime

  6. Ruth Callahan

    I have come to believe when a doula starts viewing her own experiences of giving birth in this same way, her own journey in bringing her to where she is now as a doula, it frees the doula to be present caring for the client’s needs, letting go of any agenda for the client.

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